Friday, June 22, 2012

Thoughts from Temple U.

Updated 2012/06/22 15:45, see correction below.


That's Temple University Japan, not Temple Valley University (which doesn't exist - yet).





In this captivating(45 minute) lecture from Temple University Japan, Ben Karp* speaks on "Japan & African Americans from the Russo-Japanese War to Pearl Harbor." After the lecture Karp half-jokingly notes that "in America this would be really obscure, and interesting to about eight people and I'm not even sure I'm one of them." "But," he adds, "it's a really important time period and I think some of the questions of nationalism and also racial romanticism really still matter today. Especially since we're not finished with empires at all in this world..."  


So sit back and prepare to be enlightened as Ben Karp spotlights this "obscure" but important chapter in America and Japan's shared history. You can read a little more about Ben Karp's lecture and lots more @ BlackTokyo.


*Karp is a doctoral candidate at Yale University focusing on African American - Japanese relations from the period 1905 to 1941. He will return to lecture at Temple University's Japan campus on July 5th.


Correction: I had earlier spelled the speaker's name, "Karp," with a "C" and provided an erroneous link to Ben Carp, another smart guy with the same name only spelled like the fish. I hope I've got it right this time.

8 comments:

  1. Thanks so much for posting this (with the right spelling) and your kind words. In fact Ben C-arp (who is indeed smart and also an accomplished historian) and I once attended the same University and occasionally got one another's mail.

    I will be back at ICAS on the 5th of July to discuss the US election and to try to measure the extent to which race is a factor, even subtly. All are welcome.

    http://www.tuj.ac.jp/events/2012/0705.html

    Best regards,

    BK

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for commenting and for the invitation to the ICAS lecture. I hope to attend. I also look forward to seeing the eventual publication of a book by you on Du Bois and Japanese - African American relations in the first half of the 20th century some time in the near future.

      Delete
    2. thanks for the linkback and for catching the spelling error!

      Delete
    3. I had revisited BT on Saturday to comment on the misspelling but by then it was already fixed. I guess someone should really tell the folks at Temple University about the error (after all it's their mistake).

      Delete
    4. Yes, Johntaro, Temple corrected it for my next talk and video. Thanks for the link. I have been a reader of BT.

      Delete
  2. Thank you for sharing this accessible and brilliant lecture. Posting at FB, will repost at our blog...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's great! Many people should see this. I'm not too sure if I would have clicked the play button if someone told me it would take almost an hour to watch. I'm glad I did though, because it was a riveting lecture from beginning to end.

      Delete
  3. This is a thought provoking and complex story. It's interesting that Japanese thinkers viewed Black Americans as equals and were genuinely sympathetic to their struggle for human rights in America (and willing to champion the cause of equality on the international level at the end of WWI) but took an entirely different view of Koreans, Chinese and others when building their empire. I guess the story of the human race and relations between peoples is hardly ever just black and white.

    ReplyDelete